All Blogposts tagged as 'games'

  • The Hide&Seek Weekender 2012

    29 August 2012 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    The Hide&Seek Weekender is now just two and a half weeks away! And this year it’s more crammed with amazing games than ever. There’s free games in the Clore Ballroom on Friday, Saturday and Sunday; a meander around the Southbank on Friday night, with Midnight Tourism; and a mass game of paranoia and stealth on Saturday night, with Incitement, followed by an amazing party in the Old Vic tunnels. Then on Monday we’ll be back at the Southbank Centre for a conference on Playing in Public, with panels, discussions, artist showcases and more.

    Read on...

  • The Hide&Seek Weekender 2012

    29 August 2012 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    The Hide&Seek Weekender is now just two and a half weeks away! And this year it’s more crammed with amazing games than ever. There’s free games in the Clore Ballroom on Friday, Saturday and Sunday; a meander around the Southbank on Friday night, with Midnight Tourism; and a mass game of paranoia and stealth on Saturday night, with Incitement, followed by an amazing party in the Old Vic tunnels. Then on Monday we’ll be back at the Southbank Centre for a conference on Playing in Public, with panels, discussions, artist showcases and more.

    Read on...

  • Dying and living to tell the tale

    31 January 2012 | by Tom Armitage | 5 comments

    This is a talk that I gave as part of the Southbank Centre‘s festival Death: A Festival for the Living. It’s a short, personal history of dying in videogames: a medium where death is common, and lives are plural but rationed. Why is it that “dying” such a common metaphor in games – even supposedly non-violent ones? Does it have any meaningful significance compared to the process of death in the real world? This essay is a short exploration of that, based on a life in which I’ve died thousands of times.

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  • The New Year Games: what was all that about, then?

    19 January 2012 | by Holly Gramazio | 5 comments

    Photo by Chris Scott

    On 1 January 2011, Hide&Seek and Unique Events ran the New Year Games. Somewhere between 10,000 and 12,000 people played. You probably weren’t one of them.

    Usually, our live events have a core of people who know us: people who’ve been to a Sandpit or a Weekender before, people who like games, people who know a little about what to expect. Of course they’re often outnumbered by newcomers and passers-by and people who saw the brochure lying around and didn’t have anything else to do, but the familiar core is still there. On 1 January, though, our audience was people who were wandering around Edinburgh: residents out for a walk; visitors who’d come up for Hogmanay and couldn’t leave because the trains weren’t running yet; people with hangovers; wandering families. People who are almost guaranteed not to be reading this blog post. We weren’t really sure how many of them to expect. It turned out there were quite a lot.

    It was a silly big game and hundreds of people were involved in making it work, on the day and in the months before: stewards and producers and drummers and actors and guys who put up Helter Skelters and Heads of Games and a samba band and the Lord Provost of Edinburgh and a poet and people on New Year’s Eve  stapling sheets of cardboard at 9pm or printing out stickers at 4:30am. I’ve been trying to write it up and it’s just too big, there’s too much of it. But I can at least write down some of the things I want to remember for next time.

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  • What We’re Playing: Summer 2011

    02 September 2011 | by Tom Armitage | 0 comments

    After a summer of projects in Edinburgh and further afield, as well as various holidays, the team are back in the studio – which means it’s time for another round-up of what people have been playing recently.

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  • Fox Hunt at the Southbank

    17 August 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    On Sunday 20 August, from 12 to 4pm, there’s going to be a fox hunt at the Hayward. We’ve been working with the Hayward and The Fox Project to create a game for familes - a chance to find out more about foxes, track one around the Southbank, and follow it to its den.

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  • GDOET: Everyday Gaming

    16 August 2011 | by Tom Armitage | 0 comments

    Porlex Grinder

    This month, my Kill Screen column is about Everyday Gaming. It’s about the way what’s often called “casual gaming” is, in fact, just gaming that fits into everyday life, and the many ways there are to achieve that.

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  • Tiny Games at the Southbank

    15 August 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 5 comments

    This is a tiny game that we made:

    It’s one of ten tiny games that have been stuck to the ground around the Southbank. It’s two sentences long. Part of the reason it’s so short is that it’s site-specific: designed to be played on a piece of ground with big square pavers, like the space you can see here near the Hayward Gallery. When the playing field is right in front of you, the rules can be a little more succinct.

    This is another tiny game:

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  • What We’re Playing: May 2011

    09 June 2011 | by Tom Armitage | 0 comments

    Time for another round-up of what everybody in the studio’s been in the past month.

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  • Programming Games

    25 May 2011 | by Tom Armitage | 10 comments

    I forget why, but in a meeting last week, I wrote CARNAGE HEART in giant letters in my notebook. Which is how I ended up thinking about “games about programming”, in its loosest possible sense. And then, I made a big list.

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  • Programming Games

    25 May 2011 | by Tom Armitage | 0 comments

    I forget why, but in a meeting last week, I wrote CARNAGE HEART in giant letters in my notebook. Which is how I ended up thinking about “games about programming”, in its loosest possible sense. And then, I made a big list.

    Read on...

  • Games IN SPACE

    10 May 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 1 comment

    It’s time to play… in SPACE. You can find a part of our latest project at the Newton Astronomers blog, where a bunch of amateur astronomers with a little 8″ reflector telescope have been picking up something strange in the sky. It’s just possible that they could use your help. Alternatively, if you’re in the mood for something more heroic, you could head over to the Green Lantern Boot Camp and train your will, your courage, and your angry swan.

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  • What We’re Playing: April 2011

    21 April 2011 | by Tom Armitage | 0 comments

    Mass Effect 2

    This is the first installment of a new regular feature, in which I ask the Hide & Seek team to talk a little about something they’ve been playing in the past month. Just in time for the Bank Holiday weekend, here are April’s anecdotes:

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  • Games you play in the dark: Blindfolds

    11 March 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    The title of this post is misleading – blindfold games aren’t games you play in the dark, pretty much by definition. If it was dark anyway, why would you bother putting a blindfold on someone?

    The point of blindfold games is the asymmetry. Blind Man’s Buff, and the mass of other “blind man” Victorian parlour games, all demand that a blindfolded player either catches, or else identifies, someone who can see. There’s an earlier pig-chasing game that was reported at some village fairs, where blindfolded players tried to catch a pig with bells on – and even in this case, where all the players are blindfold, the point of the game depends on some people being able to see; it’s not the sort of thing you’d play without spectators.

    The title of this post is misleading – blindfold games aren’t games you play in the dark, pretty much by definition. If it was dark anyway, why would you bother putting a blindfold on someone?

    The point of blindfold games is the asymmetry. Blind Man’s Buff, and the mass of other “blind man” Victorian parlour games, all demand that a blindfolded player either catches, or else identifies, someone who can see. There’s an earlier pig-chasing game that was reported at some village fairs, where blindfolded players tried to catch a pig with bells on – and even in this case, where all the players are blindfold, the point of the game depends on some people being able to see; it’s not the sort of thing you’d play without spectators.

    Read on...

  • Games you play in the dark: Focus

    10 March 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 1 comment

    A lot of in-the-dark games use the absence of visual cues to make sure players concentrate on something else: on sounds, typically, or sometimes touch. Somethin’ Else’s Papa Sangre is the recent, staggeringly successful example. Since it’s an iPhone game it’s not necessarily played in the literaldark, but players have no visual cues at all, and have only sound to respond to; which for a screen-based game is as meaningfully “in the dark” as it gets.

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