Can’t play, won’t play

06 October 2010 | 24 comments

I like neologisms. We need new words because we have new ideas, and ideas are the only things that break the law of the conservation of energy. Where once there was nothing there now is something, and the history of the neologism is a history of those moments of pure creation.

‘Gamification’, that said, can go take a long walk off a short pier. I’m heartened beyond measure to see that it’s been deleted from Wikipedia.

‘Gamification’, the internet will tell you, is the future. It’s coming soon to your bank, your gym, your job, your government and your gynaecologist. All human activity will be gamified, we are promised, because gamifying guarantees a whole bunch of other buzz-words like Immersion! and Emotional Engagement! and Socialised Monestisation! You’ll be able to tell when something’s been gamified because it will have points and badges. And this is the nub of the problem.

That problem being that gamification isn’t gamification at all. What we’re currently terming gamification is in fact the process of taking the thing that is least essential to games and representing it as the core of the experience. Points and badges have no closer a relationship to games than they do to websites and fitness apps and loyalty cards. They’re great tools for communicating progress and acknowledging effort, but neither points nor badges in any way constitute a game. Games just use them – as primary school teachers, military hierarchies and coffee shops have for centuries – to help people visualise things they might otherwise lose track of. They are the least important bit of a game, the bit that has the least to do with all of the rich cognitive, emotional and social drivers which gamifiers are intending to connect with.

Games manage to produce all these drivers by being complex, responsive mechanisms. Games set their players goals and then make attaining those goals interestingly hard – that’s interestingly hard, as opposed to just arduous. Hitting my 50 miles in one month in Nike+ was hard, but it was just hard hard. Lots of things about running make running interestingly hard, but Nike+ added nothing to that. It just asked me to do it a lot, in a row. Collecting enough My Coke Rewards for a Coca-Cola Telenovela Club Beauty Rest Eye Relaxation Mask is hard, but it isn’t interestingly hard. It’s just a wallet-emptying, artery-thickening endurance test. Nike+ and My Coke Rewards, despite being the posterboys of gamificaiton (and despite both being in their own ways interesting projects and great successes), are in no ways games. That’s not a turn of phrase, incidentally. I mean there is no way, not one single way, in which either of them is a game.

Games give their players meaningful choices that meaningfully impact on the world of the game. Deciding to run two miles today rather than one, or drink two liters of Coke instead of four are just choices of quantity. Deciding to dump my sniper rifle for an energy sword is a meaningful choice. It’s going to change how I move, who I fight, when I run. It’s literally going to change whether I live or die, and that -  for which I thank the stars – is currently something Nike and Coke can’t match.

And living or dying is important. Games offer fail conditions as well as win conditions. They are able to deliver the high levels of emotional engagement they’re famed for because they’re also adept at delivering the lows of loss, humiliation and frustration. The world of user experience design from which the concept of gamification has arisen has spent the last twenty years erasing loss, humiliation and frustration from its flows. A world of badges and points only offers upwards escalation, and without the pain of loss and failure, these mean far less. And when this upward escalation is based only on accumulation of points, rather than on expressions of my choices and my skills, then this further strips out the sense of agency and competence, so crucial to the emotional and neurological buzz we get from gaming.

It’s crucial that we stop conflating points and games.

Firstly, because it devalues points. Points are great. So are badges. Everything you’re reading on the pro-gamification posts about how powerful they are as motivators and rewards is spot on. Game designers resort to them – I resort to them – so often because they’re fantastic tools, and as with all tools there is real art and science behind deploying them well. They deserve to be studied, refined and adapted on their own terms, with their own vocabulary.

But secondly, because it misrepresents games. Gamification is an inadvertent con. It tricks people into believing that there’s a simple way to imbue their thing (bank, gym, job, government, genital health outreach program, etc) with the psychological, emotional and social power of a great game. And when their gamified thing doesn’t deliver on that promise, the only rational thing for them to do is to turn round and say ‘Games don’t work! We gamified the dickens out of this thing, and it still didn’t make as much money/reach as many users/generate as much social heat as World of WarCraft/Farmville/Minecraft’. Any game designer looking at their gamified thing would say, ‘Of course it didn’t do what those things did! Those things are all games and your thing isn’t!’ But they won’t be heard, because they won’t be in the room, since – and this is very telling – the gamification process rarely involves any actual game designers.

Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither.

It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly.

So, in summary:

Gamification, as it stands, should actually be called poinstification, and is a bad thing because it’s a misleading title for a misunderstood process, although pointsification, in and of itself, is a perfectly valid and valuable concept which nonetheless needs to be implemented carefully with due concern for appropriateness and for unintended consequences, just as actual gamification, namely the conversion of existing systems into functioning games, is also a valid and valuable process which carries its own concerns, but which now cannot with any clarity be referred to as gamification since that term is already widely associated with the process of what should more properly be called poinstification, and which we therefore propose be instead termed ‘luding’, mostly because it sounds a bit like ‘lewding’.

Or, in other words:

Games are good, points are good, but games ≠ points.

Picture by R J Malfalfa.

24 comments on this post.

  • On 6 Oct 2010, Tommy said:

    Margaret-

    You make some good points on the term gamification and it’s misuse from the perspective of a true gamer.

    At BigDoor we are enabling website owners to add game mechanics easily through our API. The term itself is just what the industry has adopted and I agree with you that it potentially doesn’t reflect very well exactly what is going on.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 7 Oct 2010, Ben Sawyer said:

    Bravo! Shared similar if derivative thoughts recently on my own here. This piece will help me with my second in-progress post later next week. Thank you!

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 7 Oct 2010, Tim said:

    I can’t thank you enough about this post. I’m currently enrolled in a Master’s degree, and my thesis is about applying game mechanics/dynamics/design in the re-design of a student-focused social network. My main concern is to understand goal structuring and challenges as a main motivator in games, and implement mechanisms on this social network which will allow the community to create academic goals and challenges for each other to foster long-term engagement and motivation – and not graphical rewards for brainless, repetitive actions. The current hysteria about “badgeification” or (“pointsification”, as you call it) posing as gamification just makes me sick. Sometimes I’m kind of embarrassed telling people that I’m interested in gamification. Again, thank you.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 7 Oct 2010, Isaak Kraft van Ermel said:

    ‘Gamification’ as it is now has more in common with Pavlov’s dog than actual meaningful interaction.

    Play is what makes the game, not rewards.

    I’m a proponent of applying Game Design to real world issues, but the way we’re going about it right now is just plain wrong.

    As such I applaud you. Good read.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 8 Oct 2010, Richard said:

    Hurrah! Agree entirely, and you make two great points I missed when I thought about this (http://www.richardsandford.net/2010/04/23/points-are-not-games/) – the lack of involvement of game designers, and that points aren’t a bad thing.

    All this recent anti-gamification talk after all the pro-g. talk makes it feel a bit like narratology vs. ludology all over again. Thanks for skipping to the end and providing a properly balanced perspective. Also, luding: ace.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 8 Oct 2010, Ron Williams said:

    I think you are missing the boat. There are some idiot marketing people who try to gamify services and there are people who will succeed at ganification of services. It’s early, it’s misunderstood, and it’s going to be huge (and back in Wkipedia before the end of Jan 2011). It’s like why would anyone play a game through their TV with just 2 bars and a dot?

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 8 Oct 2010, Kathy sierra said:

    @Ron – I believe you have (against your will) made the point of this post. The “just two bars and a dot” represented the meaty core of what games can be… an elegant, perfect blend of ever-increasing challenge + skill. Not points for the sake of points. No badgeification.

    As I type this , airline passengers around the globe are absorbed, immersed, fully engaged with a pencil and a sudoku. No points, no badges, no leader boards. Just the soul of what makes a game a game.

    This post… I could not love it more.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 8 Oct 2010, Duleepa Wijayawardhana said:

    Great article. I agree with you on several points. Pointsification in and of itself is not a game. Badges in and of itself is not a game. “Gameification” can be related to any number of different things and it should have both the points and the badges to show how you are doing, but then have a progression and regression system which allows you to improve etc. The problem is tying that to “Real Life”. We do this at Empire Avenue (empireavenue.com) by tying your virtual share price to how you do on social media. Now you are playing a game, with yourself mostly, but you are getting really useful data, the game mechanics hopefully teach you more on how to connect to new interesting people and you can get points and badges/achievements for gaining success.

    However, the challenge, as you say, you must have the risk of failure and with Empire Avenue, if you cannot engage in Social Media, or say something bad etc. there is the risk your share price will fall. So, yes, it can be done and it can be done in an engaging way.

    Having said that, Games are also what an individual sees as a game. If ousting someone as Mayor in a location is that challenge then it is a game played by you. But the chance that you might not get there, the chance that someone can best you and the challenge that poses must be in a game for it to be called a “game”!

    Best,
    Dups

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 11 Oct 2010, Trapper Markelz said:

    A great post, and something that I am personally grappling with as we look at how to crack the engagement problem in health products. Gamification is a funny term because it really just means using game mechanics… and that is all they are right? Mechanics? Just having them there does not make a game. There are so many other complicated aspects like story/narrative, structure, feedback, environment, art, music, etc that create the emotional and fulfilling experiences games provide. We definitely want these things for our products and getting there is going to be more challenging and expensive than many of us are considering. It is a worthy fight though… and an exciting one.

    I think the best part about gamification is that it is attracting many product-minded people to industries and problems that weren’t that attractive prior. That could be the biggest benefit of all this. I caused me to move from the video game industry into the health industry. How many more are doing the same?

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 11 Oct 2010, Andrus @ Talentag said:

    Love the idea of clear diffentiating between gamification and ‘pointification’. Useful to bear in mind for many.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 12 Oct 2010, Martin said:

    Definitely agree with the your semantic argument here. “Pointification” is a better word than “Gamifcation”, and they are definitely different things, but I do not agree with the premise that points != a game.

    Remember the meta-game! What about someone who buys and plays through an XBox live game they don’t even want to play, just to get those achievement points? Aren’t they playing a game? I think they are.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 13 Oct 2010, Dagda said:

    Personally, I think of them as “incentive systems”.

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 14 Oct 2010, David La Cross said:

    And living or dying is important. Games offer fail conditions as well as win conditions. They are able to deliver the high levels of emotional engagement they’re famed for because they’re also adept at delivering the lows of loss, humiliation and frustration.

    Great post, and I mostly agree with your sentiment…adding a simple loyalty-system-style points/rewards system does not turn your marketing program into a game. However, I’d be curious to know what you think about social games like Foursquare. Re: the quote above, you can definitely “lose” in Foursquare (be ousted as the Mayor). You can also suffer the more subtle “loss” of just having very lame check-ins while watching your friends do awesome stuff. You can strategically decide whether or not to check in to a place depending on what you’re trying to achieve with your check-ins. You can win. You can lose. You can create strategy & see results.

    Long story short, Foursquare is essentially just a “pointification” system…it just took something people were doing anyway (going places) and slapped a point/reward system on top of it. Yet some degree of rich gameplay has evolved.

    The points/rewards become the framework out of which the gameplay can arise…perhaps in unexpected ways. Is running 50mi in Nike+ all that different than grinding to level up in WoW? Or walking 2 blocks out of your way to go to “your” coffee place & defend your mayorship?

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 23 Oct 2010, Josh W said:

    Metric based feedback systems, where you set the metrics and compare people on the basis of them, or encourage people to “beat their record” are a management technique at least 50 years old. It’s not a game idea at all!

    On the other hand, if points are not the special thing about games, what about levels? You know, where beating a certain point in the metric leaves you with a perminant advantage over people and unlocks new challenges?

    How about no-extra-pay promotion? You’ve leveled up to supervisor, you are now more important and can boss people, and you unlock new harder tasks like making sure everyone locks up the building!

    So these are pretty old, and pretty pervasive forms of pseudostatus from 50s corperate culture. Is it any suprise that “points and levels” are what people who don’t understand games simplify them to?

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

  • On 27 Oct 2010, Antony Highsky said:

    I came across a very interesting article that touches closely on the subject of this blog post. The article describes an ongoing project that has had thousands of gamers working alongside supercomputers to shape protein molecules into versions that might be helpful to medicine. It seems like it could be a case study in the effective use of using gaming concepts to achieve practical ends. One of the scientists quoted observes: “There was a constant back-and-forth between scientists, game developers and players to achieve the best balance.” Here is the link to anyone interested: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100804151406.htm

  •  
    Trackback: That word….’Gamification’ « The Evil Number 27′s occasional bivouac on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] [1] Article by Hide & Seek entitled “Can’t play. Won’t play” – read it here [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Gamification Part 2 « Char 141 : Ben Sawyer's Personal Blog on 8 Oct 2010

    [...] In practice, or at least most practice and 99% of perception gamification is about what Margaret Robertson so-deftly called “pointification” and I in a speech I did earlier this year said was the proliferation of “score [...]

  •  
    Trackback: The Gamification Fallacy — tadej.eu on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] – Margaret Robertson, Hide & Seek [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Infovore » Links for October 11th on 11 Oct 2010

    [...] Can’t play, won’t play | Hide&Seek – Inventing new kinds of play "Gamification is the wrong word for the right idea. The word for what’s happening at the moment is pointsification. There are things that should be pointsified. There are things that should be gamified. There are things that should be both. There are many, many things that should be neither. It’s important that we make the distinction between the two undertakings because, amidst all this confusion, we’re losing sight of the question of what would happen if we really did apply the deeper powers of game design to more everyday things – if we really did gamify them – and that question is a fascinating, exciting and troubling one. I really hope we get a chance to explore it properly." Margaret, on good form, as ever. (tags: games gamification achivements margaretrobertson ) [...]

  •  
    Trackback: LPT » Blog Archive » Gamification of Green Stamps and So Much More on 13 Oct 2010

    [...] would use the term gamification to describe it, but that in itself has raised a controversy recently – with the Wikipedia entry for it being taken down, then re-posted. David Helgason of Unity, a [...]

  •  
    Trackback: Roundup: Ongoing Gamification Debate « Ada Chen Rekhi's Blog (@adachen) on 19 Oct 2010

    [...] topic or even the right word. There’s a discussion on whether or not it’s actually just badgeification or pointsification. Whatever the semantics, it seems at least the concept of game mechanics is here to stay. This [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better?: Tech News « on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: If Voting is a Social Game, Will It Make Democracy Better? | AniChaos.com on 22 Oct 2010

    [...] are those who dislike the whole trend of what some are calling “gamification,” which has seen game mechanics like points, badges and “levelling up” applied to all [...]

  •  
    Trackback: This Week In Video Game Criticism: Game Stories Deserve Better « Games News and Updates on 24 Oct 2010

    [...] continues its exploration into why we play. Margaret Robertson from Hide&Seek looks at the word gamification and why it doesn’t mean what marketing people think it means. And Sinan Kubba looks at Nier [...]

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